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Cruise into the sunset on your own boat

Your wife is a “soccer mom” driving an SUV. You have a few other cars parked in the garage. Your annual vacation takes you to exotic destinations every summer – and increasingly every winter as well. You dine out every weekend – and some weeks have extra weekends. You think life is no longer a struggle. You are moderately well off. All your creature comforts are taken care of. And along comes Al Marakeb and spoils it all!

Al Marakeb makes boats in Sharjah. And their latest Scylla35 is aimed squarely at you. For about Dh145,000 (not including a Dh 120,000 engine) Basel Shuhaiber, Managing Director of Al Marakeb, now wants you to add a boat to your collection.
Basel and Nour - the team behind Scylla35

Basel has been building boats since he was very young. He built one for his dad who loves fishing. Basel says that it is the ugliest boat he has ever made but it served the purpose and he has enjoyed many fishing trips on it.

The new Scylla35 is built with passion and an in-depth knowledge that experience brings. While reeling in a big catch sometimes you have to go around the boat – and you can safely do that on the Scylla35 as there are no barriers on either side. Even the entrance to the cabin below is carefully thought out. The press of a button magically lifts the stairs on one side of the boat to let you in to a comfortable room below. Equipped with a double bed, some sofas which can be used for sleeping children, a bathroom and air conditioning, you can relax in this cabin while anchored overnight in some cove.

The 35 foot Scylla35 can cover 300 km in a single tank and can be used for weekend trips with the family as well as off-shore cruising, game fishing or open water diving expeditions.

Al Marakeb can currently manufacture two Scylla35 boats every six weeks and Nour Al Sayyed, their young Architect and Head of Design who has a degree from the American University of Sharjah School of Architecture, states that the modular design structure of the boat enables her to customize each boat based on individual buyer requirements.  She enjoys her work at Al Marakeb which allows her to test each boat at sea – cruising into the sunset is certainly a good way to earn a living!


And of course, now that we know how affordable their boats are – you don’t even have to pay high marina charges for berthing the boat as you can just roll it on to a trailer and park it at home – life will be incomplete until you tick off your bucket list and become the proud owner of a Scylla35.

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