General Travel News

Dnata World Travel Announces Launch into India

DUBAI, U.A.E. - Dnata World Travel has announced it will extend its global reach still further by entering into the Indian travel market.

Initially focusing on bringing Dnata's expertise in the Corporate Travel sector to travellers in India, Dnata expects to commence operations by the second quarter of 2011. More than a hundred staff will be recruited to provide services in a centralised travel service contact centre, with offices in Delhi and Mumbai.

With an established and successful network across the GCC, Dnata World Travel sees a great deal of potential in its expansion into India, where it will offer its knowledge and experience across all aspects of travel management, including airline bookings. It will also focus on corporate travel, as well as the Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions market. There are also plans to expand its Indian operations still further later on, by extending their business to introduce retail and online booking.

Making the announcement today at the Business Travel Show at the Madinat Arena in Dubai, Abdulla Tawakul, Senior Vice President, Corporate and Regional Network, Dnata Travel Services, said: "Dnata World Travel is wholly committed to this venture to bring our expertise to customers in India. Unlike other regional ventures we have undertaken, we will not be taking on a local partner, but running the business and making the total investment ourselves. This gives an indication of the level of commitment and investment that we are willing to make to ensure India is a successful operation."

He continued: "Historically ties between U.A.E. and India have been very strong with nearly 1.5 million Indians residing in the U.A.E. In the Gulf Region, Dnata World Travel is synonymous with travel, quality and service. Backed by our 50-year history, strong industry partnerships and technological advances we are ready to offer the same world class value for money travel services that our customers in the Gulf have come to expect from us."

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