Airline

Ryanair removing toilets to make way for extra seats

Forget about paying 1 Euro for an overpriced glass of water, you're going to need the bladder space.

The European low-budget airline Ryanair has announced plans to remove two of the three toilets on its planes. The reduction will allow Ryanair to add 6 extra seats.

At least the plans to charge passengers to use the bathroom have been abandoned.

According to CEO Michael O'Leary, this move would lower fares by five percent. That amounts to a £2 saving on a £40 ticket, reports The Independent.

"We're trying to push Boeing to re-certify the aircraft for six more seats, particularly for short-haul flights", O'Leary told the paper. "We very rarely use all three toilets on board our aircraft anyway."

Ryainair's fleet is solely comprised of Boeing 737-800 aircraft. And, if Boeing agrees to the added seats, there's nothing to stop the bathroom cuts, as there's no law mandating that airplanes have toilets.

This isn't the first move by the airline that's raised eyebrows. Ryanair came under fire back in June with its policy of charging passengers to print a boarding pass. In September it was announced that Ryanair would charge a fee to purchase tickets with any credit card besides the airline's own prepaid MasterCard.

There was also the time Ryanair gave a sandwich to a passenger suffering cardiac arrest and then charged him for it. 

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