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Famous Islamic Landmarks

Tomb of Salahuddin Ayyubi

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The green tomb on the right (refer to the picture above) houses the grave of Salahuddin Ayyubi, the Muslim general who fought the Crusaders at the Horns of Hattin in northern Palestine and recaptured Jerusalem for the Muslims on 2nd October 1187 CE. On the left is an empty marble sarcophagus donated by Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany to the mausoleum.

 Salahuddin Ayyubi’s real name was Yusuf ibn Ayyub, the title of Salahuddin “The righteousness of the faith” was given to him as a result of his actions as a soldier fighting for Islam. He was born in Tikrit, in modern-day central Iraq, to Kurdish parents. Between 1187 and 1189 AD Salahuddin Ayyubi captured 50 Crusader castles and much of the Crusader kingdom. His actions as a kind and just ruler made even his enemies remember him as chivalrous and honourable. During the siege of the Kerak castle he refused to bombard a tower in which a honeymoon couple were staying.

Baha ad-Din, one of Salahuddin’s officials wrote, “...Everyone who appeared before him was treated with honour, even infidels . Once a Frank prisoner was brought before the Sultan. He took one look at Salahuddin and the prisoner became white with fear and terror and agitation was clearly visible on his face. The interpreter asked him: ‘What are you afraid of?’ the prisoner replied, ‘At first I was afraid of seeing that face, but after seeing it and standing in his presence, I am sure that I shall see only good in it.’ The Sultan was moved, pardoned him, and let him go free”

Salahuddin and Richard (the Lionheart) grew to respect one another as military leaders. When he heard that Richard had fallen ill in Ascalon, he sent peaches and pears to help restore him to health. He also sent packs of snow from Mount Hermann to cool the King’s fever. At Arsuf, when Richard lost his horse, Salahuddin sent him two replacements.

 The Jewish philosopher Maimonides was one of Salahuddin Ayyubi’s personal physicians. When Jerusalem was recaptured, Salahuddin invited the Jews, who had been banished by the Crusaders, back to Jerusalem to live peacefully among the Muslims.

 Salahuddin died of a fever on March 4, 1193, at Damascus, not long after Richard's departure. Salahuddin had given most of his money away as charity. When they opened his treasury they found there was not enough money to pay for his funeral.

 

(Information obtained from Islamic Landmarks' website)

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 November 2013 20:16

Hits: 3800

Noah's Ark

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The remains of the Ark built by Prophet Nuh (Noah) can be found in Mount Judi in south-east Turkey, close to the Syrian and Iraqi borders.

The Quranic account of the Flood and Noah's Ark agrees with that given in the Bible, with a few variations. One of these concerns the final resting place of the Ark. According to Genesis, the Ark is grounded on the "mountains of Ararat"; while according to Surah 11:44 of the Qur'an, the final resting place of the vessel was called Mount Judi:

"Then the word went forth: "O earth! Swallow up thy water, and O sky! Withhold (thy rain)!" and the water abated, and the matter was ended. The Ark rested on Mount Judi, and the word went forth: "Away with those who do wrong!" [11:44]

The picture above is believed to be the current remains of the Ark on the mountain. 

 

(Information obtained from Islamic Landmarks' website)

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 November 2013 20:20

Hits: 3788

Tomb of Hud

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This tomb, in Hadhramaut, Yemen belongs to Hud (a.s.) who was sent as a Prophet to the people of ‘Aad.

The people of ‘Aad were known for their strength and size. The majority however, rejected the invitation of Hud (a.s.) and were destroyed by a powerful wind.

The eleventh Surah of the Quran is named after Prophet Hud (a.s.).

 

 

(Information obtained from Islamic Landmarks' website)

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 November 2013 20:18

Hits: 3777

Mosque of Cordoba

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The Mosque of Cordoba built in 784 CE is located in Andalucia, Spain. It was originally the site of a church which was bought by Emir Abd ar-Rehman I and subsequently converted into one of the largest mosques in the world. Cordoba while lead by Muslims became one of most advanced cities in its time, as well as a great cultural, political and economic centre. The Mosque of Cordoba featured as a great centre of learning.

 

The building is most notable for its giant arches, with over 1,000 columns of jasper, onyx, marble, and granite; the double arches, which were a new architectural feature and the rich and exquisite design patterns making it one of the most beautiful mosques to have existed.

In 1236, Cordoba was recaptured from the Muslims by King Ferdinand III and the mosque was deconsecrated as a Christian church, with the most significant alteration being the construction of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the middle of the structure.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 01 November 2012 17:30

Hits: 3591

Memorial to Imam Bukhari

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This memorial complex, near Samarkand in Uzbekistan, houses the grave of Imam Bukhari, a Muslim scholar known for compiling the Hadith (sayings of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him)). The collection named Sahih Bukhari, regarded as the most authentic of all hadith compilations and is the most authoritative book after the Quran.


Imam Bukhari was born in 810 CE in the city of Bukhara (in Uzbekistan). His full name was Muhammad Ibn Ismail Ibn Ibrahim Ibn al-Mughirah Ibn Bardizbah al-Bukhari. He had a phenomenal memory and travelled throughout the Islamic world devoting himself to the collection, study, proof-reading and organizing of the hadith.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 June 2012 12:54

Hits: 3627

Site where Ibrahim (a.s.) was thrown into the fire

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This site in Urfa, Turkey is believed to be the place where Ibrahim (a.s.) was thrown into the fire by Namrud (Nimrod) for refusing to submit to the worshipping of idols. Close by is a cave where he is said to have been born. Urfa was formerly known as Edessa and was the setting for several battles during the Crusades.


Note that this incident and the birth of Ibrahim (a.s.) is also claimed to be in Ur, in southern Iraq.

 

 

(Information obtained from Islamic Landmarks' website)

Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 November 2013 20:19

Hits: 3918